Browse Prior Art Database

Display With Vertical and Horizontal Segments for Devices With Very Small Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044446D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mack, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

This display will provide more display context for electronic typewriters with small (one- to two-line) displays. Electronic display typewriters currently exist with small displays (e.g., LCD design) of one line and 12 to 40 characters. Typewriters in the near future may have somewhat bigger displays, up to one to two lines, and perhaps 40 to 80 characters. But these displays are very limited in what the user can use of what they are typing or revising (compared to the 24 or so line CRTs standard for word processing systems). A modification of these limited displays is described herein which can make it easier for users to keep track of aspects of a document's content and format, as well as help users scroll around with the electronic document. This would be done with a display shaped like a "T" (on its side).

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Display With Vertical and Horizontal Segments for Devices With Very Small Displays

This display will provide more display context for electronic typewriters with small (one- to two-line) displays. Electronic display typewriters currently exist with small displays (e.g., LCD design) of one line and 12 to 40 characters. Typewriters in the near future may have somewhat bigger displays, up to one to two lines, and perhaps 40 to 80 characters. But these displays are very limited in what the user can use of what they are typing or revising (compared to the 24 or so line CRTs standard for word processing systems). A modification of these limited displays is described herein which can make it easier for users to keep track of aspects of a document's content and format, as well as help users scroll around with the electronic document. This would be done with a display shaped like a "T" (on its side). The display would have a long (standard) horizontal display and a vertical segment on the left end of the horizontal part. The vertical segment allows the user to see more vertical context for the lines fully displayed in the horizontal segment. An example would be a one- line 80-character (standard) display to which was attached a vertical segment 10 columns wide and 8 lines long. The diagram below illustrates the concept in appreciated form.

(Image Omitted)

While the "T" display would provide more visual information than the equivalent (standard) two-line by 80-character di...