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Method for Curing and Holding Semiconductors for Organic Encapsulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044447D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Munroe, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the semiconductor fabrication process, undesirable spreading of polymer to the underside of the chip can make mounting more difficult. The present technique represents an improved method of curing and holding chips for organic encapsulation during the fabrication process. Avoiding the undesired adhesion of polymer to the underside of semiconductors undergoing fabrication is especially important in tape- mounted automated bonding (TAB) processes wherein the device being manufactured is mounted to a metal or polymer/metal tape and exposed to handling and environmental stresses prior to being placed in a final assembly.

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Method for Curing and Holding Semiconductors for Organic Encapsulation

In the semiconductor fabrication process, undesirable spreading of polymer to the underside of the chip can make mounting more difficult. The present technique represents an improved method of curing and holding chips for organic encapsulation during the fabrication process. Avoiding the undesired adhesion of polymer to the underside of semiconductors undergoing fabrication is especially important in tape- mounted automated bonding (TAB) processes wherein the device being manufactured is mounted to a metal or polymer/metal tape and exposed to handling and environmental stresses prior to being placed in a final assembly. Organic passivation, such as a high purity epoxy or silicone, is sometimes put on such devices; however, such materials typically cover all sides of the chip and run to the underside, making solder mounting, or planar mounting with organics, extremely difficult. A close-up illustration of the technique of this article is presented in Fig. 1. By providing a porous medium which resists polymer adhesion, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, monochlorotrifluoro- ethylene, or various silicones, it is possible to place a semiconductor device on such a medium, hold the device down by a partial vacuum on the bottom of the medium, apply a polymer to the top of the device, and cure the polymer. In this manner, the polymer is free to coat the top of the chip and run down the sides, but it is not able to wet the bottom of the chip. Subsequent bonding by solder, eutectic alloys, or polymers is, therefore, made significantly easier,...