Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Source Boost Converter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044481D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jackson, CR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a circuit arrangement wherein a switching power system front end accepts 70-240 volts alternating current (AC) inputs or 36-300 volts direct current (DC) battery backup inputs and converts to a regulated high voltage DC (HVDC) value. This arrangement eliminates the need for separate power supplies or power supply wiring for different AC line voltages. It also yields limited power factor correction and provides direct operation from 36 to 48 volts DC, thereby solving the sensitivity problem to momentary power line outages. Referring to Fig. 1, L1, Q1, D1 and L2, Q2, D2 along with C1 and C2 are configured to form a dual boost inverter, with AC voltage input converted to DC via the bridge rectifier B1.

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Multi-Source Boost Converter

This article describes a circuit arrangement wherein a switching power system front end accepts 70-240 volts alternating current (AC) inputs or 36-300 volts direct current (DC) battery backup inputs and converts to a regulated high voltage DC (HVDC) value. This arrangement eliminates the need for separate power supplies or power supply wiring for different AC line voltages. It also yields limited power factor correction and provides direct operation from 36 to 48 volts DC, thereby solving the sensitivity problem to momentary power line outages. Referring to Fig. 1, L1, Q1, D1 and L2, Q2, D2 along with C1 and C2 are configured to form a dual boost inverter, with AC voltage input converted to DC via the bridge rectifier B1. This dual boost inverter will convert the varying DC voltage to a regulated HVDC value by alternately switching the metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) Q1 and Q2. The gate control signals A and B for MOSFET Q1 and Q2 come from pulse-width-modulator (PWM) module M1 via MOSFET drivers Q5 and Q6, as shown in Fig. 2. The PWM module M1 is controlled indirectly by a HVDC feedback signal VHV, a line voltage reference signal V ideal and a line current signal Vactual . These signals are developed at the points shown in Fig. 1. Referring to Fig. 2, A1 through A4 are operational amplifiers configured for processing the developed signals which, in turn, determine the pulse width of the PWM module M1. The...