Browse Prior Art Database

Forms Feed Tractor Belt

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044523D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rex, DK: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby printer forms feed tractor belts are molded in such a way so as to reduce the deflection of the feed pins relative to the tractor belt. The concept molds a tractor pin and tooth surrounding a pair or more of belts, the sides of which are irregular. This not only improves the molding process, but the pin relative to belt deflection is reduced. Tractor belts could take on the shape of belts, as shown in the three examples in Fig. 1. When the pin and tooth combination is molded onto the belts, they will appear as shown in Fig. 2. In Fig. 1, patterns 1 and 3 are repetitive at half-inch intervals to coincide with the pitch of the pins. Pattern 2 is irregular and not necessarily at a half pitch, so that the belts may not be aligned lengthwise to one another, as shown in Fig. 3.

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Forms Feed Tractor Belt

A technique is described whereby printer forms feed tractor belts are molded in such a way so as to reduce the deflection of the feed pins relative to the tractor belt. The concept molds a tractor pin and tooth surrounding a pair or more of belts, the sides of which are irregular. This not only improves the molding process, but the pin relative to belt deflection is reduced. Tractor belts could take on the shape of belts, as shown in the three examples in Fig. 1. When the pin and tooth combination is molded onto the belts, they will appear as shown in Fig.
2. In Fig. 1, patterns 1 and 3 are repetitive at half-inch intervals to coincide with the pitch of the pins. Pattern 2 is irregular and not necessarily at a half pitch, so that the belts may not be aligned lengthwise to one another, as shown in Fig. 3. It is evident, as shown in Fig. 2, that the plastic used in forming the pin and tooth combination is allowed to flow freely around and between the belts, since the sections that lie above the belt are narrow and are easily formed.

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