Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Function Operator Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044537D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heybruck, WF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique describes the use of a simplified operator panel to provide multiple functions for printer applications. The operator panel consists of a twelve-key keypad array, as shown in Fig. 1, arranged in four rows 10, 11, 12 and 13, by three columns 14, 15 and 16. The panel also contains a three-digit hexadecimal display 17 and an audio alarm 9. Historically, printer control panels have utilized separate individual switches and indicators for each printer function. However, printers have become increasingly complex, requiring changeable interfaces. Therefore, this multi-function panel provides a universal and simplified solution by providing changeable interfaces without altering the base machine. A microprocessor 18, as shown in Fig.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Multi-Function Operator Panel

A technique describes the use of a simplified operator panel to provide multiple functions for printer applications. The operator panel consists of a twelve-key keypad array, as shown in Fig. 1, arranged in four rows 10, 11, 12 and 13, by three columns 14, 15 and 16. The panel also contains a three-digit hexadecimal display 17 and an audio alarm 9. Historically, printer control panels have utilized separate individual switches and indicators for each printer function. However, printers have become increasingly complex, requiring changeable interfaces. Therefore, this multi-function panel provides a universal and simplified solution by providing changeable interfaces without altering the base machine. A microprocessor 18, as shown in Fig. 2, scans the rows and columns of the keypad to determine which switch S0 to SB or multiple switches have been depressed. To activate the display, the microprocessor provides the proper hexadecimal data on the display data line 19, as shown in Fig. 3. When the latch signal 20 is activated, the data is stored in the appropriate light-emitting diode (LED) 21. Blanking or turning off the display is accomplished by activating the appropriate blanking line 22. The alarm operation is similar to the blanking operation whereby the microprocessor is programmed to activate the alarm 9. The ten numbered keys 0-9 are the primary function keys so that, when depressed alone, they provide a single numeric function....