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Large-Area Single Crystals by Zone Melting and Transfer Epitaxial Growth Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044588D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Large-area single crystals on amorphous, polycrystalline surfaces can be converted from a polycrystalline form by zone melting and a transfer epitaxial growth process. In the deposition process, the substrate orientation prevents this, according to its stability relative to the deposited film and the unchangeability of the formed crystal structure. This process provides the ability of altering the crystallographic structure of the deposit subsequent to the deposition and achieving an orientation morphology unachievable by the growth process. This is accomplished by placing an epitaxial single crystal film 11 in contact with a polycrystalline surface 12 of the same material.

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Large-Area Single Crystals by Zone Melting and Transfer Epitaxial Growth Process

Large-area single crystals on amorphous, polycrystalline surfaces can be converted from a polycrystalline form by zone melting and a transfer epitaxial growth process. In the deposition process, the substrate orientation prevents this, according to its stability relative to the deposited film and the unchangeability of the formed crystal structure. This process provides the ability of altering the crystallographic structure of the deposit subsequent to the deposition and achieving an orientation morphology unachievable by the growth process. This is accomplished by placing an epitaxial single crystal film 11 in contact with a polycrystalline surface 12 of the same material. Provide a local hot zone 13 that will produce a molten interface 14, and this will create a new single crystal material 15 which will grow throughout the crystalline layer. The current development and use of rapid thermal annealing methods are ideally suited to the production of large-grain crystalline films of metals by surface melting. Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate the process of an initial and a later stage.

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