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Generation of Run-Length Signal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044589D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Yamaguchi, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes the generation of a run-length signal, such as WHITE 3, BLACK 2, WHITE 3 indicating "00011000" in a bit stream, by dividing the bit stream into eight bit groups, i.e., bytes, and by addressing a table by the use of the byte. Referring to the figure, image bits of the bit stream are divided into plural bytes. White and black tables are provided. Both tables include nine subtables #l through #9. Each byte is used as an address for accessing the subtables. The white table is selected when the byte follows a preceding white bit. The black table is selected when the byte follows a preceding black bit. For example, the byte A selects the white table since the preceding bit is "0". The byte A represents a hexadecimal number 18; then an address X'18' of the subtables #l-#9 is accessed.

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Generation of Run-Length Signal

This article describes the generation of a run-length signal, such as WHITE 3, BLACK 2, WHITE 3 indicating "00011000" in a bit stream, by dividing the bit stream into eight bit groups, i.e., bytes, and by addressing a table by the use of the byte. Referring to the figure, image bits of the bit stream are divided into plural bytes. White and black tables are provided. Both tables include nine subtables #l through #9. Each byte is used as an address for accessing the subtables. The white table is selected when the byte follows a preceding white bit. The black table is selected when the byte follows a preceding black bit. For example, the byte A selects the white table since the preceding bit is "0". The byte A represents a hexadecimal number 18; then an address X'18' of the subtables #l-#9 is accessed. The subtable #l stores the number of white bits which first appear consecutively, i.e., "3", in byte A. However, when the first bit of the byte is "l" such as the byte C, the subtable #l stores "0". The subtable #2 stores the nunber of consecutive black bits which appear next, i.e., "2", in byte A, and the subtable #3 stores the number of consecutive white bits which appear next, i.e., "-3", in byte A, wherein the sign "-" indicates the end of byte. In this manner, the value "3, 2, -3" is fetched from the white table. Since the first value "3" indicates that the first three bits in byte A are the white bits, the value "3" is added to t...