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Browse Prior Art Database

Bump Internal-Thermal Enhancement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044615D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Yeh, WC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for removing heat from a high powered large-scale integrated circuit chip packaged on ceramic modules. In this design (Fig. 1), the objective is to join a bump (which is attached to the cap) and the receiver together in the gap 1 between the chip 2 and the cap 3. This structure provides an efficient heat path by the mechanism of heat transfer conduction from the chip (heat source) to the cap (heat sink). In addition, the design utilizes the gap as a more efficient conduction path, as compared with other types of internal thermal enhancements. BITE (bump internal-thermal enhancement) consists of two parts, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 wherein Fig. 3 is a top view of the cross-section shown in Fig. 4. The bump 4 (Fig.

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Bump Internal-Thermal Enhancement

Disclosed is a system for removing heat from a high powered large-scale integrated circuit chip packaged on ceramic modules. In this design (Fig. 1), the objective is to join a bump (which is attached to the cap) and the receiver together in the gap 1 between the chip 2 and the cap 3. This structure provides an efficient heat path by the mechanism of heat transfer conduction from the chip (heat source) to the cap (heat sink). In addition, the design utilizes the gap as a more efficient conduction path, as compared with other types of internal thermal enhancements. BITE (bump internal-thermal enhancement) consists of two parts, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 wherein Fig. 3 is a top view of the cross-section shown in Fig. 4. The bump 4 (Fig. 1) is normally semi-spherical in shape, and it performs somewhat in the manner of an extrusion from the cap 3. The bump, which can be made of metallic material (i.e., solder ball) or of the same material as the cap (i.e., ceramic), depends on the thermal requirements. A metallic bump would have a better thermal performance. The height 8 of the bump 4, is smaller than the height of the gap 1. The bump receiver 5 (Figs. 1 and 2) can be visualized as a hollow cylindrical structure that has a flat bottom surface 9 to give a larger contacting surface area between the chip and the receivers. The sidewall 12 (of the receiver 5) has a curvature in order to reduce stresses caused by thermal expansion and contraction. The top surface 10 of the receiver is sectioned into fingers 11. The height of the receiver 17, is comparable to the height of the bump 4 (Fig. 2), and the diameter 15 of the bump 4 is slightly smaller than the diameter 14 of the receiver 5. The receiver 5 is made of metallic sheet (i.e., copper). Depending on the material strength, the thickness of the receiver 5 and section fingers 11 (some may have to be eliminated) can be determined so that when the bump 4 pushes down on the receiver 5 and the chip 2, the overall load is small enough not to destroy the c...