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Removal of Adhering, Absorbing Material From Transparent Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044638D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lane, TJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Transparent substrates are often coated with an adhering, absorbing material, either intentionally (e.g., specific coatings or films) or unintentionally (e.g., dirt, spattered liquids, vapor deposition). Removal of the absorbing material, either over the entire interface or in a selected pattern, is important. A technique for removing adhering, absorbing material from a transparent substrate is described, where the substrate can be either cleaned or patterned in a nondestructive, onestep method. To remove the absorbing layer, the interface between the transparent substrate and the absorbing layer is irradiated by a laser beam shining through the transparent substrate, as indicated in Fig. 1A.

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Removal of Adhering, Absorbing Material From Transparent Substrates

Transparent substrates are often coated with an adhering, absorbing material, either intentionally (e.g., specific coatings or films) or unintentionally (e.g., dirt, spattered liquids, vapor deposition). Removal of the absorbing material, either over the entire interface or in a selected pattern, is important. A technique for removing adhering, absorbing material from a transparent substrate is described, where the substrate can be either cleaned or patterned in a nondestructive, onestep method. To remove the absorbing layer, the interface between the transparent substrate and the absorbing layer is irradiated by a laser beam shining through the transparent substrate, as indicated in Fig. 1A. The transparent substrate 10 is subjected to radiation 12, causing the absorbing material 14 to be physically separated from the substrate, as indicated by the arrows 16 (Fig. 1B). The laser beam deposits energy in a shallow layer of the absorbing material 14 at the interface of the absorbing material and the substrate, causing the layer to change its chemical and/or physical nature (e.g., decompose) so that the absorbing material 14 no longer adheres. The absorbing material 14 then breaks away from the irradiated interface, leaving a clean, undamaged surface on the transparent substrate 10. As an example of this technique, a polished quartz substrate was painted with black enamel spray paint. The interface was irradiated with a pulse of radiation at 248 nm from an excimer laser, providing pulses of length approximately 10 nsec. and pulse fluence of about 100 mJ/cm2 . The paint...