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Reverse Current Leakage Compensation in Solid-State Diode Detectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044649D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cullum, DG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Leakage current in a solid-state electron detector is compensated by a second diode fabricated in the same substrate as the detector diode. Solid-state diode detectors are used in the fields of nuclear spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The depletion region of the diode is the sensitive part of the detector because the charged or energetic particles slow down and cause ionization there. This ionization process produces electron hole pairs, which are collected at the appropriate electrodes as signal current. These diodes are operated in the reverse bias mode to increase the depletion depth and to reduce the capacitance of the diode. The reduction of the diode capacitance increases the band-width of the detection system.

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Reverse Current Leakage Compensation in Solid-State Diode Detectors

Leakage current in a solid-state electron detector is compensated by a second diode fabricated in the same substrate as the detector diode. Solid-state diode detectors are used in the fields of nuclear spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The depletion region of the diode is the sensitive part of the detector because the charged or energetic particles slow down and cause ionization there. This ionization process produces electron hole pairs, which are collected at the appropriate electrodes as signal current. These diodes are operated in the reverse bias mode to increase the depletion depth and to reduce the capacitance of the diode. The reduction of the diode capacitance increases the band-width of the detection system. However, the reverse current leakage and variations of this current (increases by a factor of two for every 10OEC rise in temperature) inhibit use of the detector system in the DC mode. A structure is shown in which the current leakage is compensated for by the use of a second diode fabricated in the same substrate (silicon) as the detector diode. Fig. 1A is a plan view of this structure, and Fig. 1B is a cross-sectional view. Fig. 2 shows the equivalent circuit. Use of an integrated structure such as this ensures that both the detector and the leakage sensor are fabricated under the same conditions and therefore have the same silicon purity, metal contact interfaces, p...