Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Fiber With Spaced Blips of Increased Cross Section for Improved Coupling Between Ends of Fibers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044833D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, AH: AUTHOR

Abstract

An optical fiber is prepared with periodic blips where the fiber is wider than normal. Fibers are conventionally produced by a glass drawing process in which the width of the drawn fiber is controlled by the speed of the drawing process. The blips are produced by momentarily slowing the drawing process. They are made short enough to not interfere with the normal characteristics of the fiber. The blips are spaced apart by a distance that provides a convenient increment of length of a completed optical conductor. For example, blips would be formed one meter apart if finished cables were to be handled in various lengths of an integral number of meters. The optical conductor is otherwise conventional. In the manufacturing process, a continuous conductor is formed and is cut into suitable lengths.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Optical Fiber With Spaced Blips of Increased Cross Section for Improved Coupling Between Ends of Fibers

An optical fiber is prepared with periodic blips where the fiber is wider than normal. Fibers are conventionally produced by a glass drawing process in which the width of the drawn fiber is controlled by the speed of the drawing process. The blips are produced by momentarily slowing the drawing process. They are made short enough to not interfere with the normal characteristics of the fiber. The blips are spaced apart by a distance that provides a convenient increment of length of a completed optical conductor. For example, blips would be formed one meter apart if finished cables were to be handled in various lengths of an integral number of meters. The optical conductor is otherwise conventional. In the manufacturing process, a continuous conductor is formed and is cut into suitable lengths. These cuts are made at the position of a blip, and the fiber on each side of the cut is substantially wider than normal. With the increased fiber width, the conductor is easier to couple to the fiber of a similar conductor or to other optical components.

Anonymous

1