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Improved Device For Supporting a Glass Substrate During Electronic Device Preparation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044861D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hershoff, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During the fabrication of plasma display panels, various materials were utilized as setter tiles for glass plates or completed panel assemblies, one preferred setter tile including 99.5% alumina. While the alumina tiles were satisfactory for single furnace cycles, higher production from the processing furnaces entailed stacking of the glass plates alternately with spaced setter tiles, and more rapid temperature rise and cooling. This, in turn, resulted in thermal fracture of some setter tiles, attributed to the high thermal expansion coefficient of the alumina.

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Improved Device For Supporting a Glass Substrate During Electronic Device Preparation

During the fabrication of plasma display panels, various materials were utilized as setter tiles for glass plates or completed panel assemblies, one preferred setter tile including 99.5% alumina. While the alumina tiles were satisfactory for single furnace cycles, higher production from the processing furnaces entailed stacking of the glass plates alternately with spaced setter tiles, and more rapid temperature rise and cooling. This, in turn, resulted in thermal fracture of some setter tiles, attributed to the high thermal expansion coefficient of the alumina.

Two materials with suitable supporting properties and excellent thermal shock resistance characteristics were PS-441, a mullite-zircon from Wilbanks International Inc., and zerodur, a glass ceramic from Schott America, were substituted for the alumina tiles. Both materials have considerably lower thermal expansion than Al2O3 and exhibit superior thermal shock resistance. Further, both materials show no evidence of reaction with a glass substrate when used during the conventional furnace processing involved in plasma display panel fabrication.

Anonymous

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