Browse Prior Art Database

Device-Independent Window Management Techniques

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044865D
Original Publication Date: 1984-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

By defining window management actions conceptually, then mapping concepts across different technologies available, a user may be offered a consistent interface across different keyboard/display workstation products.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Device-Independent Window Management Techniques

By defining window management actions conceptually, then mapping concepts across different technologies available, a user may be offered a consistent interface across different keyboard/display workstation products.

Current display workstations typically orient their user interface for window management specifically to the display technology provided. This typically results in different user interface concepts from display to display.

A solution to this problem is to define window management actions in terms of basic concepts involving window border segments, action buttons, visual feedback techniques, and action semantics. These basic concepts are then mapped into various types of display workstation technologies ranging from character oriented displays with keyboards, to all-points-addressable displays using locator devices and pointers.

Because the concepts are consistent across types of workstations, product families can be offered across a wide range of cost and function while maintaining a consistent user interface appearance. Also, because the techniques are consistent conceptually, it may be possible to switch between techniques on the same workstation. For example, when a locator device on a workstation is inoperative, the user might continue to perform productive work by using keyboard cursor keys to drive the pointer, the fundamental user interface concepts not having changed.

Disclosed anonymously

1