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Printing Throughput Enhancement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044918D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schall, TE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The typical wire matrix printer may have a vertical array of wires on the print head comprising seven, eight, or nine print wires. These print heads normally scan in the horizontal direction back and forth along the print line, and various wires in the vertical column are fired at appropriate times to generate character font images.

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Printing Throughput Enhancement

The typical wire matrix printer may have a vertical array of wires on the print head comprising seven, eight, or nine print wires. These print heads normally scan in the horizontal direction back and forth along the print line, and various wires in the vertical column are fired at appropriate times to generate character font images.

In many countries, point of sale terminal printers are also employed for the purpose of drafting checks. These instruments are relatively long in the horizontal dimension and may exceed the 40-character print line that some machines normally employ. Therefore, the check may be turned to run lengthwise instead of horizontally through the printing area and, by appropriate re-orientation of the timing signals for wire fires, characters may be printed "lying on their side" and in the proper order to reconstruct the desired horizontal character lines on a check. Of course, this takes some considerable time, since the paper must be incremented and the print head scanned back and forth numerous times in the ordinary font since only one or two characters will be printed per pass of the print head.

This article describes a technique for decreasing the apparent throughput by reducing the width of the characters. Typically, if a fine-wire print head is employed, the ordinary full size characters are composed in a 7 x 7 matrix with two additional spaces left over for character to character spacing. A variety of typical character fonts may employ a 5 x 7 basic matrix with ascending dots or descending to emphasize certain characters. This description employs the foregoing technique of scrambling the characters to print them "lying on their sides", but utilizes an altered font which occupies only a 4 x 7 matrix. Using this approach, two 4 x 7 character cells ca...