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High Pressure Cleaning System for Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044924D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergh, TA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Several companies have developed the so-called "brushless scrubbers" for silicon wafers using a jet of high pressure liquid, usually DI water. The above technique can be applied to the cleaning of magnetic disks (both substrates and magnetically coated disks). Substrates cleaned by this method using a proto-type model have shown yield increases at single disk test from the normal (control) at 77% to 95-100%. The method is particularly effective against "B" side defects with typical missing bit valves being reduced by factors of 2 to 6.

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High Pressure Cleaning System for Disks

Several companies have developed the so-called "brushless scrubbers" for silicon wafers using a jet of high pressure liquid, usually DI water. The above technique can be applied to the cleaning of magnetic disks (both substrates and magnetically coated disks). Substrates cleaned by this method using a proto-type model have shown yield increases at single disk test from the normal (control) at 77% to 95-100%. The method is particularly effective against "B" side defects with typical missing bit valves being reduced by factors of 2 to 6.

The above technique is usually used on silicon wafers which are much smaller than a magnetic disk. To make this technique practical, a means had to be found to clean large areas in reasonable time. A machine according to the present technique can scrub clean a 14" disk on both sides at the rate of one per minute.

Many configurations of the water jets are possible. In one design, the 16 nozzles are arranged in a circle but lined up in such a way that the .008" jets impinge on the disk surface in a straight line about 1/8" long (16 x .008"=.128"). This line of jets is spiralled out from the inside diameter to the outside diameter to cover the entire disk surface.

Another design had 8 jets in a line at 1/2" intervals. These jets were oscillated along the line +/- 1/2 inch, each jet therefore covering a 1" wide band as the disk was rotated under it. The disk rotational speed is such that each pas...