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Thermally Conductive Ceramic Substrate for Magnetic Heads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044938D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rigby, EB: AUTHOR

Abstract

A ceramic substrate for the rapid dissipation of heat from a magnetic head can be made of a silicon carbide, including alumina and boron powders. Colloidal-sized particles are utilized, and the conductive properties are controlled by the incorporation of a predetermined amount of alumina in the silicon carbide grain boundaries.

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Thermally Conductive Ceramic Substrate for Magnetic Heads

A ceramic substrate for the rapid dissipation of heat from a magnetic head can be made of a silicon carbide, including alumina and boron powders. Colloidal-sized particles are utilized, and the conductive properties are controlled by the incorporation of a predetermined amount of alumina in the silicon carbide grain boundaries.

A useful substrate for magnetic heads is a dense ceramic having good wear characteristics while being thermally conductive and which can be polished to a flat, pore-free surface. A boron-alumina bonded silicon carbide can be prepared utilizing colloidal-sized particles. The thermal-electrical conductive properties of the ceramic can be controlled by the incorporation of predetermined amounts of alumina in the silicon carbide grain boundaries. The procedural steps for making the ceramic substrate are as follows.

1. A silicon carbide powder is prepared by firing a mixture of silicon oxide powder with printing ink type carbon, preferably in an alumina tube furnace. The conditions of this step are preferably 1500 degrees C for five hours in an argon atmosphere.

2. The silicon carbide powder is then milled, preferably in an alumina mill with alumina inserts containing boron powder, alumina powder and a high boiling point naphtha milling medium.

3. The slurry is filtered and dried, preferably in a vacuum oven to remove the organic medium.

4. Boron-bonded beta silicon carbide blocks are th...