Browse Prior Art Database

Sensor Arrangement on Robotic Overload Protection Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044985D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Will, PM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A sensor arrangement is described that is useful in a computer controlled robotic manipulator system such as that described in the U.S. Patent 4,132,315. That patent, as well as U.S. Patent 3,948,093, describes the control of linear movement of a manipulator arm and rotational movement in various directions of a hand or gripper incorporated as an integral part of the manipulator arm, the gripper comprising two fingers. Sensor devices, including strain gauges and Wheatstone bridge circuitry, are provided in the patented devices to supply feedback signals representative of forces and movements applied in predetermined directions on the fingers.

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Sensor Arrangement on Robotic Overload Protection Structure

A sensor arrangement is described that is useful in a computer controlled robotic manipulator system such as that described in the U.S. Patent 4,132,315. That patent, as well as U.S. Patent 3,948,093, describes the control of linear movement of a manipulator arm and rotational movement in various directions of a hand or gripper incorporated as an integral part of the manipulator arm, the gripper comprising two fingers. Sensor devices, including strain gauges and Wheatstone bridge circuitry, are provided in the patented devices to supply feedback signals representative of forces and movements applied in predetermined directions on the fingers.

The individual force sensors include Cartesian compliant I-beam or "dog- bone" elements represented in a simplified form in Fig. 1. These are integrally formed in the hand/finger mechanisms and may entail relatively long down-time and high replacement cost in case of damage.

A quickly replaceable dog-bone sensor structure is described here that meets all the necessary requirements but that has minimum cost. The structure meets compliance specifications, but needs no wires. Servicing time is minimized. In the structure described, the strain gauges are removed from the compliant structure and replaced by sensors attached to an overload protection structure, as shown in Fig. 2.

Various elements may be used for sensing the compliant deflection of the dog-bones: 1. Magne...