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Browse Prior Art Database

Fiber Optic Receiver Transmitter and Repeater

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044992D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balliet, LB: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Fig. 1 illustrates a ring network in which computing stations 2 communicate on a peer to peer basis. In normal operation, signals containing origin and destination information and data circulate unidirectionally from station to station, and are removed at destination stations. The stations contain buffers (not shown) for retaining ring traffic while originating their own transmissions.

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Fiber Optic Receiver Transmitter and Repeater

Fig. 1 illustrates a ring network in which computing stations 2 communicate on a peer to peer basis. In normal operation, signals containing origin and destination information and data circulate unidirectionally from station to station, and are removed at destination stations. The stations contain buffers (not shown) for retaining ring traffic while originating their own transmissions.

A requirement in this type of system is that each station be able to operate in a bypass mode under certain conditions of faulty reception. In this mode incoming traffic is directly shunted to the station output (to keep other stations synchronized) , and internally generated clocking signals are internally circulated (to maintain local synchronization).

When ring medium 3 is implemented by means of optical fibers, the foregoing bypass requirement can be satisfied by providing adapting circuitry at each station, as suggested in Fig. 2. Fig. 3 shows the station circuitry required. These circuits must be powered independently of the standard utility power at the station site since active circuits are required to provide the bypass function. The fiber optic reception port 10 is connectable to the internal reception circuits of the station via wire transmission port 12, and the fiber optic transmission port 14 is connectable to the internal transmission circuits of the station via wire reception port 16. In normal operation, signals received at fiber-optic reception port 10 (from a preceding station) are passed to the internal equipment of the station via wire cable link 12, and signals passing through the station equipment or originated by the station are passed via wire cable link 16 to fiber optic transmission port 14 for transmission to a succeeding station via the fiber optic link.

The configuration of the fiber optic adapting circuitry for implementing the bypass mode is identical to that required for normal operation. The bypass is actually accomplished in an...