Browse Prior Art Database

Coined Block for Self Aligning Edge Emitters to Fiber

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044994D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balliet, L: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Large radiated energy (light) losses occur at the LED (light emitting diode) or laser and the fiber interface due to mismatch in geometry of the LED and fiber. Moreover, the problem is complicated further due to the small size of the LED and fiber. Manufacturing in large quantities is practically impossible at reasonable cost. To reduce optical losses to acceptable levels, tremendous amounts of manual labor are required.

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Coined Block for Self Aligning Edge Emitters to Fiber

Large radiated energy (light) losses occur at the LED (light emitting diode) or laser and the fiber interface due to mismatch in geometry of the LED and fiber. Moreover, the problem is complicated further due to the small size of the LED and fiber. Manufacturing in large quantities is practically impossible at reasonable cost. To reduce optical losses to acceptable levels, tremendous amounts of manual labor are required.

This arrangement provides a design by which assembly time (cost) can be reduced significantly with a high level of repeatability and a high efficiency LED (or laser) to fiber coupling.

Description of Invention. The key to this improvement lies in the coined alignment block 1. The coining provides proper size grooves with very accurate dimensions with respect to each other. The shape of the grooves 2 can be seen best in Fig. 2. The alignment block also has a cylindrical vertical hole 3 to accept and retain a fiber lens 4 (an option especially attractive to LEDs) by epoxy or staking. The edge emitting chip(s) 5 is placed on one side of the fiber lens 4 (Fig. 1). The emitting surface is facing the lens 4. The chip(s) 5 is placed in the wider groove 2. Solder is fed by capillary action to join the chip to the bottom of the groove in the block 1. The two strips of the solder on the alignment block will provide the required force to self align the chip parallel to the groove (due to surface tension). This provides one terminal for the chip power. The second terminal(s) lead 6 is soldered at the top of the chip 5.

The communicating fiber 7 is placed along...