Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000044997D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greenfield, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For user convenience, it sometimes is desirable to have a keyboard assembly that is able to be raised, whereby the height of the homerow of keys can be raised from, for instance, 30 mm. to 45 mm.

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Keyboard Assembly

For user convenience, it sometimes is desirable to have a keyboard assembly that is able to be raised, whereby the height of the homerow of keys can be raised from, for instance, 30 mm. to 45 mm.

Referring to Figs. 1A and 1B, side views of the keyboard in the lower position (Fig. 1A) and the raised position (Fig. 1B) are shown. The keyboard is raised by turning knob 10 in a clockwise direction, whereby leg 12 is moved from beneath the keyboard to extend therefrom. Referring now to Fig. 2, a detailed construction of knob 10 and leg 12 are shown, both consisting of a single plastic element which is held against frame 14 of the keyboard by a compression spring
16. Fig. 3 shows an alternate embodiment in which compression spring 16 includes a portion 18, extending downwardly, which fits into groove 20 and acts as a torsion spring. Connected in this manner, whenever the back end of the keyboard is raised, leg 12 automatically is moved to the downward position, as shown in Fig. 1B.

Referring to both Figs. 2 and 3, whenever the leg is in the downward position as shown in Fig. 1B, compression spring 16 forces the common knob 10 and leg 12 element forward and locks it behind bar 22. In order for the operator to release leg 12 and place the keyboard in the position shown in Fig. 1A, it is necessary to apply manual force against knob 10, thereby depressing spring 16, to move the leg 12 back to the interior position, as shown in Fig. 1A.

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