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Browse Prior Art Database

Soldering Pins to Printed Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045048D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chirino, OI: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In conventional printed circuit technology, modules are attached to printed circuit boards by either soldering lands on the module lands to lands on the surface of the printed circuit board or pins in the modules are soldered into plated holes on the board. Such holes have to be larger than the component pin, and they therefore take a relatively large amount of internal space in the printed circuit board.

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Soldering Pins to Printed Circuit Boards

In conventional printed circuit technology, modules are attached to printed circuit boards by either soldering lands on the module lands to lands on the surface of the printed circuit board or pins in the modules are soldered into plated holes on the board. Such holes have to be larger than the component pin, and they therefore take a relatively large amount of internal space in the printed circuit board.

Shown above in Fig. 1 is a bucket technique which has a relatively large bucket on the top of the board and only a relatively small hole in the board. In Fig. 1, a printed circuit board lO has a plated through hole 11C and a pin 15 which has a recessed area or bucket 16 on the top thereof. Pin 15 is soldered into the circuit board 10 with a high melt solder. Pin 17 which is attached to a component is soldered into the bucket 16 with a low melt solder.

Fig. 2 shows a variation of the above wherein the pin 15A is not soldered into the hole in board 10A, but instead it is surface soldered to lands 19A on the board 10A.

Fig. 3 shows an alternate construction where the pin in the circuit board is surface soldered, but there is no bucket provided.

Fig. 4 shows a still further embodiment where the plated hole 11C in board 10A has a step 21C whereby the bucket is formed within the plated through hole. A pin from a module would then fit into the wide portion of the hole 11C.

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