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System for the Digital Processing of A 2048 x 2048 Pixel Image Matrix

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045096D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Linger, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

In various methods for the digital processing of the image of an object, to be examined, e.g., the metallized pattern formed on a ceramic substrate, a mask configuration, etc., the image pick-up is often a very critical step.

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System for the Digital Processing of A 2048 x 2048 Pixel Image Matrix

In various methods for the digital processing of the image of an object, to be examined, e.g., the metallized pattern formed on a ceramic substrate, a mask configuration, etc., the image pick-up is often a very critical step.

When the pick-up device used is a detector, such as the linear array of 2,045 integrated photodiodes fabricated by the Reticon Corp., allowing a complete line of 2,045 bits to be achieved, it is necessary for processing the whole image matrix (e.g., 2,048 x 2,048 bits) to associate the scanning along the X coordinates (i.e., along the diode array) with the displacement (along Y coordinates) of the sample object.

A simple solution would be to count the number of clock pulses (each one corresponding to one of the 2,045 diodes) for every line; the "end of line pulse" (every 2048th pulse) should actuate the sample object of the desired increment
(Y) along the Y coordinates characterizing a discontinuous movement of the support at each line end.

However, when the scanning speed is increased, it has been observed that the mechanical device that supports the object to be examined starts vibrating so that measurements become inaccurate.

This article suggests a method that continuously associates the Y displacement with the clock, in order to ensure a continuous motion of the support. This implies that the Reticon detector is slightly skewed (Y) with respect to the sample object (e.g., a ceramic substrate), as depicted in Fig. 1. The skew
(Y) corresponds to the incrementation of one line.

When the Y motion of the support is controlled by a synchronous motor, the control signals are to be sinusoidally shaped. These signals will be generated from the clock of the whole system (the diagram of the interface circuit assuming this function is depicted in Fig. 2). The clock pulses are counted in a se...