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Selection of Load Bearing Particle Materials for Compatibility with Commonly Used Magnetic Media Lubricants

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045131D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DePalma, V: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is proposed that load bearing particles in a magnetic disk coating be selected to minimize their catalytic reaction with lubricants applied to the disk surface. The use of lubricants on state of the art direct access storage device (DASD) magnetic media is required to provide long term stability of head flight. It is known that low flying heads quickly crash on unlubricated surfaces. Furthermore, lubrication of a disk causes an increase in abrasion resistance by at least an order of magnitude, and often more.

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Selection of Load Bearing Particle Materials for Compatibility with Commonly Used Magnetic Media Lubricants

It is proposed that load bearing particles in a magnetic disk coating be selected to minimize their catalytic reaction with lubricants applied to the disk surface. The use of lubricants on state of the art direct access storage device (DASD) magnetic media is required to provide long term stability of head flight. It is known that low flying heads quickly crash on unlubricated surfaces. Furthermore, lubrication of a disk causes an increase in abrasion resistance by at least an order of magnitude, and often more.

Common disk lubricants are silicone oils and polyfluorinated alkanes (or alkyl ethers). The fluorinated alkyl ethers have the advantages of the ability of providing high molecular weight fluids, having extremely low vapor pressures (will not evaporate), and are considered chemically inert.

Some current disk files make use of poly (prefluoronated alkyl ether) lubricants. It is known that Lewis acids, such as Fe(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3), catalyze the decomposition of these classes of compounds. Initiation of the decomposition can come from head suspension/disk asperity contacts, resulting in an adiabatic temperature increase on the order of 200-300 degrees C. Another source is through mechanical stressing of the polymer by shearing.

Shown in the figure is the catalytic ability of various Lewis acids toward lubricant degradation. It is apparent that the ca...