Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Micromachining of Cured Polymides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045143D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moskowitz, PA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Polyimides are increasingly being used in packaging because of their temperature stability, flexibility, and relative chemical inertness. They may be etched prior to curing by KOH or NaOH solutions. However, after curing by heat treatments or chemical processes, the polymerized material is relatively inert to further chemical action. In order to etch the cured polyimide, reactive ion etching or mechanical machining is required.

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Laser Micromachining of Cured Polymides

Polyimides are increasingly being used in packaging because of their temperature stability, flexibility, and relative chemical inertness. They may be etched prior to curing by KOH or NaOH solutions. However, after curing by heat treatments or chemical processes, the polymerized material is relatively inert to further chemical action. In order to etch the cured polyimide, reactive ion etching or mechanical machining is required.

Cured polyimides may be etched by a combination of a focussed laser beam and a liquid etchant. The polyimide sample 10 is placed in a bath 12 of liquid chemical etchants which has no effect on the polyimide at room temperature. An Ar/+/ laser 14 is expanded by a beam expander 16 and focussed by lens 18 to a spot size of about 10 to 20 micrometers on the surface of the polyimide sample
10. The principle lines of this laser are 488 nm and 514 nm, and are well absorbed by the polyimide sample 10. The cured polyimide will be etched in the area struck by the laser beam and will dissolve without melting. The laser beam heats and hydrolyzes the polyimide which is dissolved by the solution 12.

Mirror 20 may be scanned to produce etched grooves in the polyimide sample 10. Small laser powers are required. Laser outputs of 100 to 200 mw have been used successfully to etch polyimides.

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