Browse Prior Art Database

Forms Feed with Tear Bar Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045172D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Choberka, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Typically, wire matrix printers print on a print bar or platen which is located below the continuous forms-feed assembly. The forms are pulled up past the print bar which the print head traverses by the forms-feed assembly. The forms are held in position in alignment over the tractor assembly by spring-loaded doors on the tractor units. It should be noted that the tractor units are positioned on both the right and left sides of the forms with the printing occurring between.

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Forms Feed with Tear Bar Assembly

Typically, wire matrix printers print on a print bar or platen which is located below the continuous forms-feed assembly. The forms are pulled up past the print bar which the print head traverses by the forms-feed assembly. The forms are held in position in alignment over the tractor assembly by spring-loaded doors on the tractor units. It should be noted that the tractor units are positioned on both the right and left sides of the forms with the printing occurring between.

In the apparatus shown in Fig. 1, the print bar or platen is affixed to the side of the frames and is positioned to be within the forms-feed assembly. The print bar passes just under the pin/belt assembly, which is shown in more detail in Fig. 2, and the right and left tractors may be adjusted laterally to accommodate varying width forms.

The pin/belt assembly is driven by a pair of sprocket wheels in a conventional manner. The upper sprocket wheel may be driven by a square drive shaft under the control of a motor, and the lower sprocket wheel may be free running. The pins of the sprocket wheel fit through holes in both the belts and underside of the pins to drive the pin/belt assembly around. This is necessary to maintain a flat, smooth surface on the underside of the belt that does not interfere with the platen. Conventional forms feed tractors having pins and teeth extending on both sides of the belt cannot be used because the teeth would interfere with the...