Browse Prior Art Database

Wire Feed Mechanism for Use in an Evaporator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045220D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Adams, DJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article concerns a wire feed mechanism for use with vacuum evaporation equipment. The mechanism feeds wire to a crucible in which the wire is made molten and mixed with other molten metals to form the alloy to be evaporated. The feed mechanism features two grooved and abutting rollers which drive the wire when it is placed between them and within the grooves.

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Wire Feed Mechanism for Use in an Evaporator

This article concerns a wire feed mechanism for use with vacuum evaporation equipment. The mechanism feeds wire to a crucible in which the wire is made molten and mixed with other molten metals to form the alloy to be evaporated. The feed mechanism features two grooved and abutting rollers which drive the wire when it is placed between them and within the grooves.

The conventional roller-type wire feed mechanism used on E-gun deposition systems presents a number of problems. For example, in order to feed the wire through the required guide tube to the crucible, one foot pound of force is needed. To obtain this force, the rollers must exert pressure on the wire as the wire is driven. In existing feeders, the rollers are knurled in order to apply the pressure and minimize slippage. Unfortunately, however, the pressure applied by such feeders flattens the round wire, making it difficult to slide through the guide tube. The result is unreliable wire retract because the rollers do not exert the same force on the flattened wire that they do on the round wire. The same problem occurs with smooth rollers.

The feed mechanism of this article features rollers having a concaved groove to match the wire radius, as shown in the accompanying figure. With this design, approximately 85 percent of the wire diameter can be gripped, versus approximately 10 percent by flat or knurled rollers, which are also shown in the figure. By using th...