Browse Prior Art Database

Color Plasma Display Panel Cell Construction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045275D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pleshko, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

The color plasma display herein described is based on a technology in which phosphors are excited by the ultraviolet emission of a gas discharge. Representative gas mixtures which are rich in ultraviolet emission are Xe-A and He-Xe. Fig. 1 shows a front view to illustrate color pixels (picture elements) using three or six-cell clusters. With one cell for each color in the grouping, 6 colors can be achieved; with 2 cells for every color in a color pixel, 18 color hues and intensities are available. To geometrically keep the picture element size more independent of the number of cells turned on, a tuning fork arrangement using interleaved prongs driving from opposite sides of the panel can be used.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Color Plasma Display Panel Cell Construction

The color plasma display herein described is based on a technology in which phosphors are excited by the ultraviolet emission of a gas discharge. Representative gas mixtures which are rich in ultraviolet emission are Xe-A and He-Xe. Fig. 1 shows a front view to illustrate color pixels (picture elements) using three or six-cell clusters. With one cell for each color in the grouping, 6 colors can be achieved; with 2 cells for every color in a color pixel, 18 color hues and intensities are available. To geometrically keep the picture element size more independent of the number of cells turned on, a tuning fork arrangement using interleaved prongs driving from opposite sides of the panel can be used.

Fig. 2 shows a cross-section of two embodiments of a color panel. On the front substrate, the conductors can either be formed in grooves or on the surface. The dielectric and associated overcoat layer may be either directly over the conductors or on top of an interposed dielectric layer. The rear substrate, as shown, has grooves formed by cutting into the substrate, or by the deposition of a dielectric layer on top of the substrate which is then etched, the choice of method being dependent on the ultraviolet absorbance attainable. With the grooves in the rear substrate, the substrate may be "dyed" and will then be dark; with the grooves in the dielectric, the dielectric may be dyed to be sufficiently absorbent to the ultraviolet cell radiation. The conductors can be formed in the bottom of the grooves by a thin film deposition method or by deforming discrete wires.

The phosphors are located, as shown, in the grooves in the back plate of the panel on top of the conductors, every third groove having the same color phosphor. These phosphors can be DC conductive or not, depending on the specific design requirements. The dielectric layer on top provides the cell capacitance on the plate alone, if the phosphor is conductive, or in conjunction with the phosphor if it is not. By putting the phosphors in the grooves on top of the conductors, the resolution capability is maximum for a primary color mixing scheme. If the top of the phosphor d(p) is ...