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Gradient Doping of Polyacetylene

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045302D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clarke, TC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The procedure for the generation of a doping gradient in polyacetylene is based on a photo-initiated doping technique. By impregnating a polyacetylene film with triarylsulfonium or diaryliodonium salts and then irradiating the film from one side with light in the 250-350 nm range, a gradient of doping is generated. This occurs because the polyacetylene absorbs to some extent at these wavelengths, causing the intensity of available light to decrease with increasing distance from the film surface, in accord with Beer's Law. The degree of doping and the gradient established are controllable functions of the amount of salt in the film and the time of irradiation. The resulting distribution of dopant can be fixed after exposure by washing the unreacted salt out of the polymer film with a suitable solvent (e.g.

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Gradient Doping of Polyacetylene

The procedure for the generation of a doping gradient in polyacetylene is based on a photo-initiated doping technique. By impregnating a polyacetylene film with triarylsulfonium or diaryliodonium salts and then irradiating the film from one side with light in the 250-350 nm range, a gradient of doping is generated. This occurs because the polyacetylene absorbs to some extent at these wavelengths, causing the intensity of available light to decrease with increasing distance from the film surface, in accord with Beer's Law. The degree of doping and the gradient established are controllable functions of the amount of salt in the film and the time of irradiation. The resulting distribution of dopant can be fixed after exposure by washing the unreacted salt out of the polymer film with a suitable solvent (e.g., methylene chloride). Extended irradation leads to uniform doping throughout the film.

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