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Printhead Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045399D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boyd, DE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In serial printers, the printing mechanism typically moves laterally back and forth in an oscillating mode to perform the printing process. The process consists of accelerating the printhead from stop to operating velocity, decelerating to stop, reaccelerating in the reverse direction to operating velocity and decelerating to stop. Traditionally, the driver for the printhead has been a conventional rotary-type motor and an accompanying system to convert rotary motion to linear motion.

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Printhead Motor

In serial printers, the printing mechanism typically moves laterally back and forth in an oscillating mode to perform the printing process. The process consists of accelerating the printhead from stop to operating velocity, decelerating to stop, reaccelerating in the reverse direction to operating velocity and decelerating to stop. Traditionally, the driver for the printhead has been a conventional rotary- type motor and an accompanying system to convert rotary motion to linear motion.

The process of accelerating and decelerating the printhead and its carrier assembly transmits shaking forces to the printing frame which must be counteracted by an equal mass as in a counterweight that moves in equal but opposite directions relative to the printhead mass, thereby balancing reaction forces. The extra weight of the counterbalance doubles the workload of the motor and increases the mass of the system. As faster printing speeds are required to move the printhead, the accelerating forces increase proportionately to velocity and inversely to the time required to accelerate the system to constant velocity. The river must deliver increased power, requiring a larger, more expensive motor with accompanying increases in rotor inertia and added mass to the system.

The figures show an apparatus and a method for driving the printhead assembly by a linear induction motor and pully belt mechanism. The linear induction motor not only is the driver for the system but is situated to function also as the counterweight of the printhead assembly.

In Fig. 1, a printh...