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Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Strip Emitter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045400D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dunn, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Many electromechanical devices require positional feedback information. The system should be capable of providing a high resolution over long distance and at the same time be capable of implementation at a low cost. Some devices, such as wire matrix printers, use emitters that feed back pulses at regular distances based on signal planes crossing each other. Other printers use optical emitters, while still others do not use emitters at all. A problem with traditional emitter technologies is that high resolution occurs at a very high cost and, regardless of the cost, the resolution rapidly approaches a finite number based on the optical or copper etching capabilities.

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Magnetic Strip Emitter

Many electromechanical devices require positional feedback information. The system should be capable of providing a high resolution over long distance and at the same time be capable of implementation at a low cost. Some devices, such as wire matrix printers, use emitters that feed back pulses at regular distances based on signal planes crossing each other. Other printers use optical emitters, while still others do not use emitters at all. A problem with traditional emitter technologies is that high resolution occurs at a very high cost and, regardless of the cost, the resolution rapidly approaches a finite number based on the optical or copper etching capabilities.

The emitter system shown in the figure solves these problems.

It consists of a strip of magnetic tape 10 attached to a supporting shaft or plate 12. The magnetic strip 10 is written with binary signals identical to current tape storage systems. Current recording capabilities can easily produce 1600 transitions per inch, which is well above the other technologies which produce 50-100 transitions per inch. By greatly increasing the signals per inch, two results occur, the positional accuracy is greatly increased and the required processing load to handle the signal transition is greatly increased.

An implied benefit is that system occurrences, such as firing a print wire in printhead 14, is no longer linked to a single emitter at a fixed position. With the implementation shown in...