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Browse Prior Art Database

Printhead Carrier Transport System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045402D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Choberka, JM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Serial matrix printers typically print while moving the printing element in both left to right and right to left directions. Such printers employ microprocessors to analyze the current line and the next line to establish the shortest distance from the last character of the current line to the first character of the next line. This analysis requires the ability to reverse directions in the middle of a print line, and such requirements are usually met by utilizing stepper motors for the printhead carrier transport system. For moderate torque and resolution, these stepper motors are relatively expensive and have long turn-around times due to the mass of the armature in motion.

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Printhead Carrier Transport System

Serial matrix printers typically print while moving the printing element in both left to right and right to left directions. Such printers employ microprocessors to analyze the current line and the next line to establish the shortest distance from the last character of the current line to the first character of the next line. This analysis requires the ability to reverse directions in the middle of a print line, and such requirements are usually met by utilizing stepper motors for the printhead carrier transport system. For moderate torque and resolution, these stepper motors are relatively expensive and have long turn-around times due to the mass of the armature in motion.

The system shown in Fig. 1 utilizes a relatively inexpensive unidirectional A/C motor and two electromagnetic locking devices for the main drive. The system shown in Fig. 1 not only lowers the cost, but it also reduces the turnaround time of the carrier. A geared conventional timing belt 10 is driven by a unidirectional motor 12 at a constant velocity. Belt 10 passes over two pinion gears 14 and 16 that "free wheel", thereby maintaining the carrier stationary. The pinions are mounted on shafts 18 and 20 (Fig. 2) which, in turn, are coupled to a locking actuator 22 by shaft 24 and coupling 26 (Fig. 3).

When the printer controller receives a command to move the printhead, it applies a locking voltage to one of the actuators 22, causing the associated pinion 14 or 16 to...