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One Piece Print Wire and Return Spring

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045407D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herman, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

In conventional wire matrix printers, an armature is actuated causing a wire to move forward and strike a ribbon against the paper, leaving a dot. Thereafter, the wire is returned to a home position so that this action may be repeated time and again causing legible characters to be printed. One manner of causing the wire to return to the home position is through the use of a spring biasing the wire back towards the home position. Conventionally, the spring is separate and apart from the wire.

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One Piece Print Wire and Return Spring

In conventional wire matrix printers, an armature is actuated causing a wire to move forward and strike a ribbon against the paper, leaving a dot. Thereafter, the wire is returned to a home position so that this action may be repeated time and again causing legible characters to be printed. One manner of causing the wire to return to the home position is through the use of a spring biasing the wire back towards the home position. Conventionally, the spring is separate and apart from the wire.

Fig. 1 shows a wire 10 which has the return spring 12 fabricated therein. As the actuator 14 strikes the wire 10, it compresses the spring 12 and thrusts the wire 10 forward. Upon release of the actuator 14, the spring 12 portion of the wire returns the wire 10 to the home position.

Referring to Fig. 2, the combination wire 10-spring 12 may be fabricated by utilizing music wire inserted through the hole in a mandrel 16. The wire is then wound around the mandrel 16 in a manner sufficient to cause a spring 12 to be formed.

An alternate embodiment of the actuator wire arrangement is shown in Fig. 3 where a metal or plastic impact cap 18 is placed over the wire 12 portion of the wire 10 and the actuator 14 strikes the cap 18.

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