Browse Prior Art Database

Encoded Main Storage Size Jumpers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045418D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Grimes, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Binary encoding of the jumpers used to indicate to a data processor the amount of main storage connected thereto reduces the physical space and wiring requirements and reduces the number of I/O pins required for the processor integrated circuit module.

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Encoded Main Storage Size Jumpers

Binary encoding of the jumpers used to indicate to a data processor the amount of main storage connected thereto reduces the physical space and wiring requirements and reduces the number of I/O pins required for the processor integrated circuit module.

Data processors are constructed by mounting one or more central processing unit (CPU) modules and one or more main storage modules on a printed circuit card. The customer has the option of specifying the number of main storage modules and hence the main storage size to be provided for the processor. It is necessary for the CPU portion of the processor to know the amount of main storage with which it is provided in order to be able to determine the occurrence of invalid storage addresses.

A currently used method is to provide a group of pins on the printed circuit card, one pin being a common pin, and the other pins being connected to individual signal lines which run to a CPU module for indicating the different possible storage sizes that may be provided for the processor. During the placement of the various components on the processor card, a jumper wire is connected between the common pin and the appropriate signal pin corresponding to the number of storage modules which are mounted on the card.

The new method which is the subject of this paper is shown in Fig. 1. For the case of four possible storage sizes, only four jumper pins are required. These pins are numbered 0 through 3....