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Mechanical Coupler with High Torsional Stiffness

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045434D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Daniels, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A mechanical coupler having a spring element which engages a beveled groove on another element provides backlash-free, but disengageable, mechanical coupling between input and output drives. The device is particularly useful for driving the photoconductor on an electrophotographic copier which requires a constant velocity with zero backlash to match the image of the photoconductor without smear, harmonic striping or velocity mismatch relative to an original image.

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Mechanical Coupler with High Torsional Stiffness

A mechanical coupler having a spring element which engages a beveled groove on another element provides backlash-free, but disengageable, mechanical coupling between input and output drives. The device is particularly useful for driving the photoconductor on an electrophotographic copier which requires a constant velocity with zero backlash to match the image of the photoconductor without smear, harmonic striping or velocity mismatch relative to an original image.

Servo-motor systems for photoconductor drives magnify the aforementioned photoconductor problems because of design parameters in servo systems. A system with backlash or low natural frequency causes error magnification, out of phase oscillation between motor and photoconductor or even instability (ringing) of the entire drive.

Direct coupling of a servo motor to the driven shaft can resolve the problem, but frequently presents mounting problems and in some cases is impractical. The system described below allows decoupling along the motor shaft, engagement without "searching" rotationally for lock, stiff (high natural frequency) rotational coupling and zero backlash.

One coupler version is shown in Figs. 1 and 2 where clutch face 10 as a slot or slots 12 with a beveled cross section, as best seen in Fig. 1C. Spring 15 is mounted to clutch face 16, as by mounting screws 17 and 18, and has a tapered end portion 19 to match with groove 12, as is also shown in Fig. 1C. That is, end face 19 is tapered to conform to the interface point defined by sloped channel 12 of clutch face 10. At the interface point between coupling halves 10 and 16, spring 15 has a radiused area for face 19.

Th...