Browse Prior Art Database

Belt System for Printer Carrier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045493D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greenlief, GC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In carrier drive mechanisms that employ a timing belt to transfer rotary to linear motion, it is sometimes advantageous to utilize a cut to length belt 10 as compared to a continuous circular belt. However, a problem is created in attempting to clamp the belt to the carrier, such as the carrier 11, in a simple, inexpensive and reliable way. Moreover, in such mechanism, the question of properly tensioning the timing belt arises. Typically, a force applied normally to the belt and the resulting deflection are specified. With this method, the adjustment is cumbersome due to the need of applying the force, measuring the deflection, and adjusting the tension simultaneously. Moreover, if the approach is one of trial and error, it is time consuming.

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Belt System for Printer Carrier

In carrier drive mechanisms that employ a timing belt to transfer rotary to linear motion, it is sometimes advantageous to utilize a cut to length belt 10 as compared to a continuous circular belt. However, a problem is created in attempting to clamp the belt to the carrier, such as the carrier 11, in a simple, inexpensive and reliable way. Moreover, in such mechanism, the question of properly tensioning the timing belt arises. Typically, a force applied normally to the belt and the resulting deflection are specified. With this method, the adjustment is cumbersome due to the need of applying the force, measuring the deflection, and adjusting the tension simultaneously. Moreover, if the approach is one of trial and error, it is time consuming.

Preferably, a crimped on-belt terminal end 15 may be employed at each terminal end of the belt 10. To this end, the terminal may be stamped from sheet metal or the like with one portion, such as the portion 16 thereof, having an aperture or the like 17 therein for attachment as by a screw 18 to the carrier 11. The aperture 17, may form a slot 19, as shown in the left hand portion of the terminal 15a of Fig. 2. Moreover, the forward portion of the terminal 15 may include fingers or the like 20 which are spaced apart a sufficient distance to fall in between the teeth on the belt when bent over.

After the terminal ends 15 and 15a are attached to the terminal ends of the belt 10, an extension spri...