Browse Prior Art Database

Silicon Optical Fiber Splice

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045540D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A splice connector for optical fibers is described. The connector body is formed by joining silicon slabs having aligned anisotropicaIly etched apertures forming a sleeve which self-aligns the fibers as they are fully inserted. The sleeve is filled with an index matching thermoplastic which holds the fibers in position upon cooling.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Silicon Optical Fiber Splice

A splice connector for optical fibers is described. The connector body is formed by joining silicon slabs having aligned anisotropicaIly etched apertures forming a sleeve which self-aligns the fibers as they are fully inserted. The sleeve is filled with an index matching thermoplastic which holds the fibers in position upon cooling.

An etched, laminated and backfilled silicon structure is described which provides a field-use-compatible fiber splice. This structure can be made compatible with any standard diameter optical fiber, or can be made to join different diameter fibers by proper choice of the dimensions of the etched structure. Since these sizes are fixed by photolithography, such choices are easily implemented.

A schematic representation of the optical fiber splice is shown in the illustration. It consists of one or more cavities 10 which are formed by joining silicon slabs 12. Silicon slabs 12 may be joined using glass bonding or some other technique. Each slab 12 contains one or more anisotropically etched apertures. The apertures are defined by a standard photolithographic process. The apertures of the outer slabs are etched to allow passage of optical fibers. The aperture or apertures of the center slab are etched to a width slightly larger than the optical fiber's core diameter (dotted), but less than the fiber's outside diameter, in order to provide a stop for fibers 14, 16.

The apertures in the outer slabs provide axial...