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Multi-Chip Probe Card for Capacitance Voltage Measurements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045631D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hutchings, KJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the fabrication of semiconductor devices and circuits, degradation of reliability can result from excess mobile charge in insulator structures which are typically provided for circuit isolation or for insulating a control electrode, e.g., in IGFET devices. A multi-chip probe card is proposed which facilitates the monitoring of the mobile charge and permits more accurate measurement results to be obtained.

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Multi-Chip Probe Card for Capacitance Voltage Measurements

In the fabrication of semiconductor devices and circuits, degradation of reliability can result from excess mobile charge in insulator structures which are typically provided for circuit isolation or for insulating a control electrode, e.g., in IGFET devices. A multi-chip probe card is proposed which facilitates the monitoring of the mobile charge and permits more accurate measurement results to be obtained.

An industry-wide practice used to monitor the mobile charge is to make capacitance vs. voltage (CV) measurements on metal-insulator semiconductor capacitors before and after an electro-thermal stress cycle. In a typical instance, a wafer with a multitude of charge monitoring capacitors is placed on a heatable chuck and contact is made to one capacitor. A CV measurement is made. Then, with voltage applied continuously across the capacitor, the wafer is cycled to an elevated temperature, held at that temperature for a period of time, and returned to room temperature. The CV measurement is repeated. The entire procedure is repeated for all capacitors required in the sample plan for the wafer. The disadvantages of the above procedure are:

All but the first capacitor in the sample plan receive multiple thermal cycles, without probe contact, before undergoing a test cycle. The resistance of leakage paths across the insulator surface can be low relative to the bulk resistance of the insulator. As a result, uncontacted capacitors in the sample may be coupled by the surface leakage to the contacted capacitor and raised to an unknown potential. Sample capacitors may thus be subjected to uncontrolled electro-thermal stress before being...