Browse Prior Art Database

Ribbon Low Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045659D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aldrich, CS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In typewriters and printers using a ribbon cartridge and the like, it is convenient to have means provided for indicating to the machine operator when ribbon on the supply spool is near exhaustion. Illustrated in the drawing, and described below are two low-cost contact ensors for ribbon supply spools that minimize drag on the supply spool uring switch transition.

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Ribbon Low Sensor

In typewriters and printers using a ribbon cartridge and the like, it is convenient to have means provided for indicating to the machine operator when ribbon on the supply spool is near exhaustion. Illustrated in the drawing, and described below are two low-cost contact ensors for ribbon supply spools that minimize drag on the supply spool uring switch transition.

Referring first to Fig. 1, a switch 3 with a moveable arm 2 is mounted such that the arm movement is substantially parallel to the rotation axis of the ribbon supply spool 1. The surface 4 of the arm 2 is preferably positioned against the lower surface 7 of the supply spool 1 adjacent the center of the spool. As ribbon is expended, the outer terminal edge 6 of the ribbon moves from the surface 4 of the arm 2 to the inclined surface 5. Continued expenditure of the ribbon results in the arm 2 moving upwardly, effecting switch transition. As the switch rises, it may activate a ribbon low light or sound device to alert the operator to the ribbon low condition.

Another embodiment of the ribbon low switch is illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. In this instance, the supply spool 1, switch 3, and arm 2 are identical, except that mounted on the arm 2 is a button or the like 10 in the shape of an inverted, truncated cone. The cone is free to wobble on the switch arm through a specified range of motion. The operation of the button 10, in contact with the ribbon on the spool 1, is illustrated in Figs. 3a-3c. Operation...