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Preparation of Conducting Polypyrrole Films on Nonconducting Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045679D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clarke, TC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A procedure has been found for the growth of conducting polypyrrole films on nonconducting substrates, for example, glass. In the presence of certain oxidizing agents, pyrrole is found to polymerize to produce a coating film on the vessel containing the pyrrole solution and on any other surfaces contacted by the solution. Two successful formulations have been found to date. In the first, pyrrole is dissolved in a toluene solution containing silver perchlorate or silver tetrafluoroborate. On standing overnight, this mixture deposits a conducting polypyrrole film on the inside of the glass container. Similarly, tetrahydrofuran solutions of pyrrole and cupric tetrafluoroborate deposit polypyrrole films on the container and on glass microscope slides inserted into the solution.

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Preparation of Conducting Polypyrrole Films on Nonconducting Surfaces

A procedure has been found for the growth of conducting polypyrrole films on nonconducting substrates, for example, glass.

In the presence of certain oxidizing agents, pyrrole is found to polymerize to produce a coating film on the vessel containing the pyrrole solution and on any other surfaces contacted by the solution.

Two successful formulations have been found to date. In the first, pyrrole is dissolved in a toluene solution containing silver perchlorate or silver tetrafluoroborate. On standing overnight, this mixture deposits a conducting polypyrrole film on the inside of the glass container. Similarly, tetrahydrofuran solutions of pyrrole and cupric tetrafluoroborate deposit polypyrrole films on the container and on glass microscope slides inserted into the solution. Film thickness can be controlled by the concentration of reagents used and by the length of exposure of the substrate Using this technique, conductivities as high as 1-10 ohm/-1/ -cm/-1/ have been achieved.

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