Browse Prior Art Database

Lophine Electrochromic Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045683D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jaffe, AB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The electrochromic materials have the general structure I, wherein R may be a variety of aliphatic groups such as -CH(3), -CH(2)CH(3), etc., and X may be one or more of a variety of substituents such as those in Table I on the following page. Although these X substituents can be placed ortho, meta, or para, they are most effective in the para position.

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Lophine Electrochromic Materials

The electrochromic materials have the general structure I, wherein R may be a variety of aliphatic groups such as -CH(3), -CH(2)CH(3), etc., and X may be one or more of a variety of substituents such as those in Table I on the following page. Although these X substituents can be placed ortho, meta, or para, they are most effective in the para position.

These compounds, upon electrochemical oxidation, form stable radical- cations and di-cations that are reversible, deeply colored and stable. The peak potentials for oxidation, as measured by cyclic voltammetry, can be seen in Table
I. Typically, there are two reversible oxidation waves that are separated by approx. 200 mv. The third peak lies 800 my above the first pair, permitting greater freedom in the switching potential and less likelihood of damage to the electrochromic material due to irreversible processes. These compounds will be tolerant to overdriving due to the fact that the reversibility of the first two peaks is not affected by the third. The coulombic reversibility for compound B is particularly good. It should be noted that this reversibility is just as good even if one oxidizes in the second peak. see original

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