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Direct Simulator Attachment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045728D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Denneau, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a hardware device which provides a high band width interface between a logic processor and one or more external device, such as a memory access simulator. Each particular bit position of randomly occurring signals from the memory access simulator is provided to an assigned switch slot position on the interface, such that the interface can keep track of where the respective bits are arriving from. Following a predetermined time sequence, the input signals are provided via a switching network in parallel to the interface mechanism and to the logic simulator.

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Direct Simulator Attachment

This article describes a hardware device which provides a high band width interface between a logic processor and one or more external device, such as a memory access simulator. Each particular bit position of randomly occurring signals from the memory access simulator is provided to an assigned switch slot position on the interface, such that the interface can keep track of where the respective bits are arriving from. Following a predetermined time sequence, the input signals are provided via a switching network in parallel to the interface mechanism and to the logic simulator.

The Direct Simulator Attachment (DSA) 2, shown in the figure, increases the processor 4 switch 6 size from n x n to (n+17) x (n+17). It then requires that if, for example, 16-bit data words are being sent to the external device, then each particular bit position is assigned to a particular switch slot, and similarly in the opposite direction. Thus if , say, slots 0 through 16 are dedicated to the DSA, then data bit 0 of a word (and similarly data bit 17 if it is a longer word) must always be sent to switch slot 0, data bit 1 must always be sent to switch slot 1, and so on. Bits from different words may arrive in arbitrary sequence. Each incoming and outgoing port of the DSA contains a two-port data memory identical in construction to a port of the "switch data memory" of the Logic Processor. Bits are stored in the data memory at a program counter location durin...