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Optimum Winding for in Line Converger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045731D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beck, VD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique for determining the optimum winding configuration for in-line color CRT convergence based upon ferrite and beam geometries is described. Optimized windings according to this technique minimize the energy stored in the magnetic field whereby the electronic drive requirement can be simplified.

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Optimum Winding for in Line Converger

A technique for determining the optimum winding configuration for in-line color CRT convergence based upon ferrite and beam geometries is described. Optimized windings according to this technique minimize the energy stored in the magnetic field whereby the electronic drive requirement can be simplified.

Convergence in an in-line color CRT can be done with independent X-Y motions on the two outer beams relative to the inner beam. Multi-pole magnetic fields can be used to give the beams such deflections. The simplest solution to this problem is set forth in (*), on toroidal convergence coils. In brief, multipole fields are established in a region where the 3 beams are separated. If one considers quadrapoles and hexapoles, no field is present on the axis which is where the central beam is located. In the case of a quadrapole, the outer beams will be deflected in anti-parallel directions. If a pair of orthogonal quadrapoles are used, anti-parallel deflections in the X and Y directions can be obtained. The hexapole deflects both outer beams in parallel directions relative to the central beam. By using two orthogonal hexapoles, one can get parallel deflections in the X and Y directions relative to the central beam. By using a suitable combination of excitations of these four elements, one can introduce independent X-Y deflections of the outer beams relative to the central beam.

Quadrapoles and hexapoles are not the only multipoles which are capable of causing such deflec...