Browse Prior Art Database

Head to Medium Measurement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045778D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kula, CH: AUTHOR

Abstract

A glass-head simulates a magnetic read/write head and enables measurement of the head to medium interface. The glass head is smooth, and yet concentric measurement rings are provided within the depth of field of a recording camera.

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Head to Medium Measurement

A glass-head simulates a magnetic read/write head and enables measurement of the head to medium interface. The glass head is smooth, and yet concentric measurement rings are provided within the depth of field of a recording camera.

The glass head comprises a first glass member 10 (Fig. 1), of about 0.040 inch thickness, having a flat bottom surface, and a smooth top surface 11 whose shape is identical to an operational head, for example, spherical. A second glass member 12 is mounted to a plastic base 20 having a central aperture. Member 12 includes a flat surface 13 on which at least two concentric circles 14 and 15 (as seen in the top view, Fig. 2) are cut.

The two flat surfaces of members 10 and 12 are now bonded together. The bonding material is placed on the outer perimeter of the glass surfaces, so that it would not flow into the circles 14 and 15.

It may be preferable to grind head surface 11 after members 10 and 12 are bonded together.

The glass head can now be force-loaded into a flexible magnetic recording medium (not shown), such as a rotating flexible magnetic disk. The resulting interference pattern is viewed through the aperture in base 20. This interference pattern shows the head to medium spacing interface. In practice, the inner circle 14 has the operational head's gap location (represented by broken line 21 in Fig.
2) as its center.

Another use of the glass head is to load the head into the rotating disk, as aforesaid,...