Browse Prior Art Database

Laminating Technique for Copper Inner Planes of Multilayer Printed Circuit Board

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045793D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carey, TJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In producing multilayered printed circuit boards, it is necessary that each copper plane line up or register exactly with the copper planes above or below. The standard practice in registering the various copper per planes with each other is to use as many registration pins as required to meet the required tolerances. A "cold set" technique is proposed which insures that the parts, as they are aligned on the pins, do not move when heat and pressure are applied and maintain their initial registration. This technique provides a "cold set" at high pressure which preconditions the separating layers of glass cloth and resin to follow preinduced channels or stresses.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 96% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Laminating Technique for Copper Inner Planes of Multilayer Printed Circuit Board

In producing multilayered printed circuit boards, it is necessary that each copper plane line up or register exactly with the copper planes above or below. The standard practice in registering the various copper per planes with each other is to use as many registration pins as required to meet the required tolerances. A "cold set" technique is proposed which insures that the parts, as they are aligned on the pins, do not move when heat and pressure are applied and maintain their initial registration. This technique provides a "cold set" at high pressure which preconditions the separating layers of glass cloth and resin to follow preinduced channels or stresses.

The "cold set" technique varies from the standard laminating procedures only in the initial stages where the high pressure of 500 psi is placed on the parts for one minute and then released, creating the desired "set". From this point on, standard laminating techniques are employed, namely, heat and pressure with a cooling cycle at the end such that the parts are at room temperature when removed from the press. The initial "cold set" at the high pressure allows the entire composite to compress without disturbing the pinned registration since the resin is still at room temperature and relatively immobile. When the heat finally reaches the resin-impregnated cloth, the tendency for any movement is along the stresses or channels c...