Browse Prior Art Database

Bleach Jet Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045803D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fey, EO: AUTHOR

Abstract

A printing system that utilizes a dilute solution of bleach is described. This printing system uses pre-treated paper having a leuco-dye impregnated in or coated on the surface layer thereof. The diluted bleach solution is sprayed, by means of an ink jet nozzle or plurality thereof, onto the treated surface of the paper.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Bleach Jet Printing

A printing system that utilizes a dilute solution of bleach is described. This printing system uses pre-treated paper having a leuco-dye impregnated in or coated on the surface layer thereof. The diluted bleach solution is sprayed, by means of an ink jet nozzle or plurality thereof, onto the treated surface of the paper.

When the oxidant, for example, a dilute, aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite contacts the ordinarily colorless leuco-dye on the paper's surface, the leuco-dye is converted to its colored form. While most any oxidant which successfully oxidizes the leuco-dye could be used as the conversion agent, bleach has several advantages. In addition to its low cost, nozzle-clogging problems are avoided because of the extremely high solubility of its main constituents, sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide. Safety problems are minimized because of the low concentrations needed for the conversion of certain leuco-dyes. Furthermore, the loss of print intensity encountered in electrochromic printing systems, when certain stabilizers are used in the paper, may be easily offset by simply increasing the bleach concentration.

A typical print system of this type would use a .5 percent bleach solution that is obtained by the simple expedient of diluting commercial bleach about tenfold. Significantly higher concentrations are to be avoided since they may drive the conversion process too far, depending upon the particular dye used, causing deg...