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Browse Prior Art Database

Aid to Making Very Fine Adjustments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045857D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, CG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When the assembly of parts requires two parts to be assembled and adjusted to essentially no clearance and no bind, the assembly requires trial and error and, at best, a compromise in the interests of efficiency and time.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

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Aid to Making Very Fine Adjustments

When the assembly of parts requires two parts to be assembled and adjusted to essentially no clearance and no bind, the assembly requires trial and error and, at best, a compromise in the interests of efficiency and time.

Techniques which would normally be available for providing small clearances between parts, such as feeler gauges, do not work when the clearances are in the order of .00015". Feeler gauges of this dimension are exceedingly fragile and difficult to work with.

A solution to attaining the proper degree of clearance without excessive time, making trial and error adjustments, is to plate one of the metal parts with a very thin coating, for example, .00015" .00005" of zinc, a soft metal, and then assemble the parts such that they are in physical contact and present a binding engagement. After assembly, the parts are moved relative to each other in their normal mode of operation either manually or by a machine adapted to create such motion and thus wear in the assembly, and wear away the soft sacrificial coating of zinc. After the parts have been through the wear-in cycle, the assembly is then in a condition of essentially zero clearance/zero bind and only one assembly adjustment has been required.

This technique is applicable to any pair of parts which must move or slide relative to each other and which require an exceedingly fine clearance for proper operation.

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