Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Rise and Fall Time Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045878D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clevenger, WA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A computer program is disclosed which automates the monitoring of the rise and fall time of the outputs of the drivers on the multiplicity of pin electronics cards on a Semiconductor Device Tester. Figs. 1 to 7 show the flow diagram of the program.

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Automated Rise and Fall Time Monitor

A computer program is disclosed which automates the monitoring of the rise and fall time of the outputs of the drivers on the multiplicity of pin electronics cards on a Semiconductor Device Tester. Figs. 1 to 7 show the flow diagram of the program.

The program begins with providing the user with the selection of one of seven options to record all drivers (up to 64 separate driver cards), to record one driver, to display ~ driver on an oscilloscope, to display a driver on the terminal screen itself, the option of printing a summary on the terminal screen, the option of printing a summary on a line printer, or the option of terminating the testing operation. This occupies the flow diagram in Figs. 1 through 3 and the upper Dart of Fig. 4.

For example, assume option 1 is selected to record all drivers.

Referring to the flow diagram, the program passes through C and E to the step labeled "Display Driver No. on TSCU" (Test Station Control Unit) in Fig. 3. A display message is then displayed on the the terminal. The program now instructs the system to await the operator's pressing the advance button before the testing proceeds. Once the advance button is pressed, the program proceeds through J in Figs. 3 and 4 to the "Accept Input" step in Fig. 5. When the accept button is pressed, the "Accept Input" step is satisfied and the program passes to the step labeled "Condition Drivers".

The step labeled "Condition Drivers" in Fig. 5 calls up a sub-routine which provides the capability to automatically select a variety of input pulses to the pin electronics card, the specific pulse characteristics being specified in the subroutine called.

The program then passes to the step labeled "Set Up Scope" in Fig. 5, which calls up the "Scope Set-Up" subroutine. One of the significant advantages of the subject program is that it automates the set-up for the digitizing oscilloscope for each of the 64 separate pin electronics cards to be tested. Previously, each pin electronics card required a separate manual scope set-up operation. It is by virtue of this automated scope set-up, among other features of this program, that the total testing time for 64 pins has been reduced by a factor of 20 to 1.

For a particular pin electronics card, after the scope has been set up, the program passes to the step labeled "Hook Up Equipment" in Fig. 5 of the flow diagram, which calls a subroutine to "Hook Up" the circuit. The tester has up to 16 separate probe outputs and the "Hook Up" subroutine automatically specifies the desired one of those 16 probe outputs for connection to the specified pin electronics card to be tested. In addition, the synchronization of the clock or trigger is automatically set up by this subroutine.

The program now passes to the step labeled "Digitized Pulse" in Fig. 5 of the flow diagram, which calls up a subroutine "Digitize Pulse". This subroutine automatically scales the waveform to be viewed on the oscil...