Browse Prior Art Database

Spring Loaded Probe with Rotational Wiping Feature

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045880D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ferris, KK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Semiconductor devices are typically tested at three stages: the wafer stage the uncovered substrate stage, and the final covered module stage. In the uncovered substrate stage, as depicted in Fig. 1, the substrate 1 has mounted on it the semiconductor chips 3 which are to be tested. Contact is made with the probe 2 by applying its contacting tip 5 to the heads 4 of the pins on the substrate 1. This is done from the top side of the substrate. In the existing operation, a spring loaded pin-type probe is used which has the tip 5 in spring-loaded contact with the solder-covered head 4 of the substrate pin. Problems which have arisen with the existing probe 2 revolve around unnecessarily high contact resistance between the probe head 5 and the pin head 4 due to a limited contact area.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Spring Loaded Probe with Rotational Wiping Feature

Semiconductor devices are typically tested at three stages: the wafer stage the uncovered substrate stage, and the final covered module stage. In the uncovered substrate stage, as depicted in Fig. 1, the substrate 1 has mounted on it the semiconductor chips 3 which are to be tested. Contact is made with the probe 2 by applying its contacting tip 5 to the heads 4 of the pins on the substrate
1. This is done from the top side of the substrate. In the existing operation, a spring loaded pin-type probe is used which has the tip 5 in spring-loaded contact with the solder-covered head 4 of the substrate pin. Problems which have arisen with the existing probe 2 revolve around unnecessarily high contact resistance between the probe head 5 and the pin head 4 due to a limited contact area.

This problem is solved by the improved probe shown in Fig. 2 which has an abrasive, toothed head 5 which is caused to rotate about the angle 0 when it is displaced axially in the X direction. This abrasive action of the head 5 on the solder-covered pin head 4 causes a wiping action to take place and a greater surface area contact between the probe head 5 and the pin head 4.

The probe 2 has the head 5 mounted on the shaft 6. The shaft 6 has a helical groove 7 machined about its circumference. A guide pin 8 mounted in the housing 9 of the probe 2, engages the helical groove 7 on the shaft of the head 5 so that when the shaft 6 is displaced...