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Precision Patterning for Laser Micromachining

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000045944D
Original Publication Date: 1983-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hodgson, RT: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Laser-enhanced etching is a useful technique for etching metals, ceramics, and plastics. It uses an etchant solution in combination with a laser beam, the etchant having its greatest effect in the area struck by the laser beam. In order to eliminate the need for precisely steering the laser beam, a reflective masking layer can be used on the surface to be etched. The masking layer must be a highly reflective patterned surface layer that resists the etchant. It is deposited and patterned in the usual manner by resist techniques, using either etching or lift-off.

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Precision Patterning for Laser Micromachining

Laser-enhanced etching is a useful technique for etching metals, ceramics, and plastics. It uses an etchant solution in combination with a laser beam, the etchant having its greatest effect in the area struck by the laser beam. In order to eliminate the need for precisely steering the laser beam, a reflective masking layer can be used on the surface to be etched. The masking layer must be a highly reflective patterned surface layer that resists the etchant. It is deposited and patterned in the usual manner by resist techniques, using either etching or lift-off.

For example, where alumina/TiC ceramic is to be etched using KOH as the etchant, the patterned reflective layer consists of a 100 ~ layer of chrome evaporated on the ceramic, followed by the evaporation of 300 ~ of silver. This reflective layer is coated with a resist and exposed through a glass mask. Development of the resist and removal of the silver and chrome layers is accomplished by using standard procedures, such as acid etching or ion sputtering. The remaining resist is dissolved, leaving a protective mirror surface of silver in those areas where etching should not occur. The surface is then etched by scanning the laser beam over the entire ceramic. No etching occurs where there is silver/chrome. A remaining silver/chrome is striped using weak dilute nitric acid, followed by hydrochloric acid with Zn powder. Smooth surfaces are those which have been pro...