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Wire Matrix Printer Wire Guide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000046133D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jenkins, WM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In matrix printers, a problem is presented in altering the pattern of the wires being actuated from a loosely spaced arrangement at the actuator end acquired for the accommodation of the actuator hardware to a very compact pattern at the printing end. Conventionally, the alteration in the wire matrix pattern has been achieved by bending or curving the wire. Unfortunately, curved wire matrix printer heads have a significantly slower response time than straight wire matrix printer heads would have. In addition, curved wire heads do not have longevity or durability that straight wire heads would be expected to have. The prior art has encountered considerable difficulty in developing straight wire matrix printheads.

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Wire Matrix Printer Wire Guide

In matrix printers, a problem is presented in altering the pattern of the wires being actuated from a loosely spaced arrangement at the actuator end acquired for the accommodation of the actuator hardware to a very compact pattern at the printing end. Conventionally, the alteration in the wire matrix pattern has been achieved by bending or curving the wire. Unfortunately, curved wire matrix printer heads have a significantly slower response time than straight wire matrix printer heads would have. In addition, curved wire heads do not have longevity or durability that straight wire heads would be expected to have. The prior art has encountered considerable difficulty in developing straight wire matrix printheads. An angle was required for the straight wire to reach the nose piece (printing end) from the actuator end and there was no practical method of fabricating a nose piece with the hole arrangement in compound angles of coacting holes required in order to guide the wires through such a nose piece. Consequently, this problem was avoided by using curved wires which pass through the nose piece perpendicular to the document to be printed.

We have developed a nose piece for a matrix printer printhead which avoids the above problems by providing an arrangement of guide holes which accommodate wires at a relatively small angle with respect to the actuator end and has coacting holes at the requisite compound angles which may be easily fabricated. This result is achieved through the use of nose piece 10, as shown in the figure, fabricated from a piece of tubular material which is flattened at the wire-receiving and -exiting ends 11. This permits paired coacting holes with the requisite compound angles to be formed through the flattened tubular ends, as illustrated by corresponding holes 12 and 12' and 13 and 13',...